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dc.creatorPérez Idárraga, Alexandraes_ES
dc.creatorAragón Vargas, Luis Fernandoes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-20T14:27:04Zes_ES
dc.date.available2014-05-20T14:27:04Zes_ES
dc.date.issued2014-05-20es_ES
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/apnm-2013-0434#.VWNAp6GjaBses_ES
dc.identifier.issn1715-5312es_ES
dc.identifier.otheressn: 1715-5320es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/11062es_ES
dc.descriptionartículo (postprint) -- Universidad de Costa Rica, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Movimiento Humano, 2014. Disponible en línea desde el 09/05/2014. En proceso de edición en "Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism", doi 10.1139/apnm-2013-0434es_ES
dc.description.abstractFluid retention, thirst quenching, tolerance, and palatability of different drinks were assessed. On four different days, 12 healthy, physically active volunteers (24.4 ± 3.2 years old, 74.75 ± 11.36 kg body mass (mean ± S.D)), were dehydrated to 2.10 ± 0.24% BM by exercising in an environmental chamber (32.0 ± 0.4 ºC db, 53.8 ± 5.2% rh). Each day they drank one of four beverages, in random order: fresh coconut water (FCW), bottled water (W), sports drink (SD) or potassium-rich drink (NEW); volume was 120% of weight loss. Urine was collected and perceptions self-reported for three hours. Urine output was higher (p < 0.05) for W (894 ± 178 mL) than SD (605 ± 297 mL) and NEW (599 ± 254 mL). FCW (686 ± 250 mL) was not different from any other drink (p > 0.05). Fluid retention was higher for SD than W (68.2 ± 13.0% vs. 51.3 ± 12.6%, p = 0.013), but not for FCW and NEW (62.5 ± 15.4% and 65.9 ± 15.4%, p > 0.05). All beverages were palatable and well tolerated; none maintained a positive net fluid balance after three hours, but deficit was greater in W vs. SD (p = 0.001). FCW scored higher for sweetness (p = 0.03). Thirst increased immediately after exercise but returned to baseline after drinking a small volume (p < 0.0005). In conclusion, additional potassium in FCW and NEW did not result in additional rehydration benefits over those already found in a conventional sports drink with sodium.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Gatorade Sports Science Institute® and projects UCR-VI-245-A4-303, UCR-VI-245-B0-315es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.relationhttp://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/apnm-2013-0434#.U35TZdR53l0es_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/cr/es_ES
dc.sourceApplied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 2014, 39(10): 1167-1174es_ES
dc.subjectDeportees_ES
dc.subjectActividad físicaes_ES
dc.subjectSaludes_ES
dc.subjectHidrataciónes_ES
dc.titlePost-exercise Rehydration: Potassium-rich Drinks vs. Water and a Sports Drinkes_ES
dc.title.alternativeRehidratación post-ejercicio: bebidas con alto contenido de potasio vs. agua y una bebida deportivaes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersiones_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.1139/apnm-2013-0434es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Movimiento Humano (CIMOHU)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto245-A4-303es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto245-B0-315es_ES


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Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Costa Rica
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Costa Rica