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dc.creatorMata Jiménez, Leonardoes_ES
dc.creatorUrrutia, Juan José
dc.creatorSimhon Edgar, Alberto
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T22:36:54Z
dc.date.available2015-07-09T22:36:54Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.isbn13: 978-0890043196
dc.identifier.isbn10: 0890043191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/15078
dc.descriptionCapítulo de libro -- Universidad de Costa Rica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud. 1984es_ES
dc.description.abstractEven today acute diarrheal disease is thought of by many laymen as well as by some medical professionals in developing countries as being a syndrome of alimentary origin. Despite recognition of shigellosis, cholera, salmonellosis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and other enteric infectious diseases, there has been much difficulty in accepting the fact that most of the "nonspecific" diarrheas in the general population were also of an infectious nature. The frequent appearance of diarrhea after onset of weaning in many animal species and in man (1) and the systematic failure in the past to find pathogenic agents in a majority of the diarrheas tended to rule out a microbial etiology. Epidemiologists, pediatricians, and microbiologists suspected that the nonspecific diarrheas of childhood were also of microbial or viral origin (2) because of their characteristics in poor urban and rural settings. First, in such ecosystems, diarrhea prevails if sanitation and personal hygiene are deficient. Second, infants and preschool children are more frequently and more severely affected than school children, adolescents, and adults, which stiggests the acquisition of immunity and host resistance. Third, acute diarrhea in the community follows a pattern similar to that of other infectious diseases in that secondary cases develop after contact with the index case, eventually resulting in self-limiting to extensive outbreaks or even epidemics of great magnitude. It is clear that if personal hygiene and environmental sanitation are deficient, diarrhea is prevalent. This explains the similarity in diarrhea morbidity and mortality between some contemporary developing nations and New York City at the turn of the century, when environmental conditions in New York were as deficient as they are today in some developing nations.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica. Instituto de Investigaciones en Saludes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.publisherChronic diarrea a in children: Raven Press p. 237 - 252es_ES
dc.sourceInfectious agents in acute and chronic diarrhea of chilhood. (1984). In: Chronic Diarrhea in Children, 1st ed. New York: Emanuel Lebenthal, pp.237-252.es_ES
dc.subjectDiarrheaes_ES
dc.subjectDiarreaes_ES
dc.subjectInfanciaes_ES
dc.subjectMortalidad infantiles_ES
dc.titleInfectious agents in acute and chronic diarrhea of chilhoodes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPartes_ES
dc.typeCapítulo de libroes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es_ES


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