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Prasophyllum and its associated mycorrhizal fungi

dc.creatorMcQualter, Emily
dc.creatorCross, Rob
dc.creatorMcLean, Cassandra B.
dc.creatorLadiges, Pauline Y.
dc.date2007-11-01
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-02T22:15:50Z
dc.date.available2016-05-02T22:15:50Z
dc.identifierhttp://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/lankesteriana/article/view/7932
dc.identifier10.15517/lank.v0i0.7932
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/21234
dc.descriptionIn Victoria, there are over 330 taxa of orchid and at least half of those are threatened. The potential extinction of many of these orchids is largely due to habitat destruction caused by degradation from agriculture, industrial development and urbanisation. Effective conservation ultimately depends on the reintroduction to field sites to reinforce depleted populations. For terrestrial orchids, seed germination is the preferred method of propagation as it allows genetic variability to be maintained (Batty et al. 2006).en
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherUniversidad de Costa Ricaes-ES
dc.relationLankesteriana;
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2014 Lankesterianaes-ES
dc.sourceLankesteriana; Lankesteriana : Volumen 7, número 3es-ES
dc.source2215-2067
dc.source1409-3871
dc.titlePrasophyllum and its associated mycorrhizal fungien
dc.titlePrasophyllum and its associated mycorrhizal fungies-ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.coverageCRCen


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