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dc.creatorSánchez Murillo, Ricardo
dc.creatorDurán Quesada, Ana María
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T21:03:48Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T21:03:48Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hyp.13305es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0885-6087
dc.identifier.issn1099-1085
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/79964
dc.description.abstractTropical regions (comprised between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, 23.5°N to 23.5°S) cover approximately 36% of the Earth's landmass. They are home to 40% of the world's population, which is projected to increase over 50% by 2030 (State of the Tropics, 2014). During the last decade diverse scientific disciplines, environmental institutions, governments, and stakeholders have increased awareness of the importance of current tropical climate variability and the associated ecohydrological and societal responses (González, Georgescu, Lemos, Hosannah, & Niyogi, 2017; Wright et al., 2018). On the basis of the premise that warming‐related changes in regional and global circulation patterns will affect tropical precipitation (Chou & Neelin, 2004) and may lead to an intensification of extreme events (i.e., an increase in tropical cyclone intensities, unprecedented floods, and severe droughts; Meehl et al., 2000; Walsh et al., 2016), risk management and water resources management in the tropics represent a major challenge (Seneviratne et al., 2012). The global distribution of rainfall depicts maximum values in the tropics, where the incoming solar radiation peaks and the largest concentration of atmospheric water vapour is observed at a deeper tropopause. However, as the tropical belt is mostly covered with oceans, precipitation is not easy to monitor. Tropical ecohydrological conditions are usually under the influence of complex land–ocean– atmosphere interactions (Esquivel‐Hernández, Sánchez‐Murillo, Birkel, Good, & Boll, 2017; Wilcox & Asbjornsen, 2018) that produce a dynamic cycling of mass and energy composed of water vapour mixing ratio distributions, cloud formation mechanisms, precipitation and convergence, ecohydrological connectivity and services, groundwater recharge processes in complex aquifers, runoff generation, rapid land use changes, and vegetation dynamicses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceHydrological Processes, vol. 33(16), pp.2160-2165es_ES
dc.subjectEcohydrologicales_ES
dc.subjectIsotopeses_ES
dc.subjectClimate changees_ES
dc.titlePreface to stable isotopes in hydrological studies in the tropics: Ecohydrological perspectives in a changing climatees_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.date.updated2019-11-20T22:43:42Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hyp.13305
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigaciones Geofísicas (CIGEFI)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Físicaes_ES


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