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dc.creatorAronson, Emma L.
dc.creatorDierick, Diego
dc.creatorBotthoff, J. K.
dc.creatorOberbauer, Steven F.
dc.creatorZelikova, Tamara Jane
dc.creatorHarmon, Thomas C.
dc.creatorRundel, Philip W.
dc.creatorJohnson, Robert F.
dc.creatorSwanson, Amanda C.
dc.creatorPinto Tomás, Adrián A.
dc.creatorArtavia León, Allan
dc.creatorMatarrita Carranza, Bernal
dc.creatorAllen, Michael F.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-04T21:56:13Z
dc.date.available2019-12-04T21:56:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationhttps://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2018JG004832es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2169-8961
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/79982
dc.description.abstractGlobal atmospheric methane growth rates have wildly fluctuated over the past three decades, which may be driven by the proportion of tropical land surface saturated by water. The El Niño/Southern Oscillation Event (ENSO) cycle drives large‐scale climatic trends globally, with El Niño events typically bringing drier weather than La Niña. In a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica, we measured methane flux bimonthly from March 2016 to June 2017 and using an automated chamber system. We observed a strong drying trend for several weeks during the El Niño in 2016, reducing soil moisture below normal levels. In contrast, soil conditions had high water content prior to the drought and during the moderate La Niña that followed. Soil moisture varied across the period studied and significantly impacted methane flux. Methane consumption was greater during the driest part of the El Niño period, while during La Niña and other time periods, soils had lower methane consumption. The mean methane flux observed was −0.022 mg CH4‐C m−2 hr−1, and methane was consumed at all timepoints, with lower consumption in saturated soils. Our data show that month studied, and the correlation between soil type and month significantly drove methane flux trends. Our data indicate that ENSO cycles may impact biogenic methane fluxes, mediated by soil moisture conditions. Climate projections for Central America show dryer conditions and increased El Niño frequency, further exacerbating predicted drought. These trends may lead to negative climate feedbacks, with drier conditions increasing soil methane consumption from the atmosphere.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[DEB‐1624623]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[DEB‐1442537]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[DEB‐1624658]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[DEB‐1442714]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture/[CA‐R‐PPA‐5093‐H/1005159]/USDA NIFA/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.relation.ispartof
dc.sourceJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, vol. 124(7), pp.2267-2276es_ES
dc.subjectCH4es_ES
dc.subjectForestes_ES
dc.subjectTropicses_ES
dc.subjectMethanees_ES
dc.subjectENSOes_ES
dc.subjectEl Niñoes_ES
dc.titleENSO‐Influenced Drought Drives Methane Flux Dynamics in a Tropical Wet Forest Soiles_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.date.updated2019-11-19T20:41:08Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2018JG004832
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Biología Celular y Molecular (CIBCM)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Estructuras Microscópicas (CIEMIC)es_ES


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