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dc.creatorPacheco Solano, Katherine
dc.creatorBarrantes González, Alexander
dc.creatorDolz, Gaby
dc.creatorTroyo Rodríguez, Adriana
dc.creatorJiménez Rocha, Ana Eugenia
dc.creatorRomero Zúñiga, Juan José
dc.creatorTaylor Castillo, Mayra Lizeth
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T14:13:47Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T14:13:47Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405673119300819es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2405-6731
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/80500
dc.description.abstractInfection of dogs with Rickettsia spp. can result in inapparent, mild, or severe disease. Moreover, common dog ticks and fleas are able to transmit rickettsiae to nearby humans. In this study, the seroprevalence of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae was determined in dogs of Costa Rica, as well as possible risk factors associated with exposure. An interview of owners and clinical examinations were performed in a country-wide sample of 441 dogs. IgG antibodies were determined in 399 dogs by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using antigens of Rickettsia rickettsii, R. amblyommatis, and R. felis. The presence of Rickettsia spp. gltA gene was evaluated by PCR in ticks and fleas. Poisson regression was performed to assess possible risk factors associated with seropositivity, as well as with having PCR-positive ticks and fleas. The overall seroprevalence to SFG rickettsiae was 10.0% (end titers 64 to 256). Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. (116/441; 26.3%) and Ctenocephalides felis (153/441; 34.7%) were the most common ectoparasites. Rickettsia DNA was detected in 30% (39/130) and 32.3% (56/173) of tick and flea pools, respectively. Seropositivity was significantly associated with mean age of 2 to 7 years, scrotal edema, walking problems, large size, and tick and flea infestation. Being a purebred dog was a possible protective factor. The presence of Rickettsia PCR-positive ticks was associated with being a purebred dog, while flea treatment was protective. Having PCR-positive fleas was associated with being purebred and the number of people in the dog's environment; protective factors were free roaming and being an outdoor dog. Results confirm that dogs in Costa Rica are exposed to different species of SFG rickettsiae. This may represent a risk to human health and underscores the need for accurate diagnosis in dogs and humans. Surveillance of rickettsial infection in canines may provide useful indicators to understand the epidemiology of these zoonoses.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[803-B1-653]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceParasite Epidemiology and Control, vol.7, pp.1-9es_ES
dc.subjectSeroprevalencees_ES
dc.subjectRickettsiaes_ES
dc.subjectCaninees_ES
dc.subjectRisk factorses_ES
dc.subjectCosta Ricaes_ES
dc.titleExposure of dogs to Rickettsia spp. in Costa Rica: Risk factors for PCR-positive ectoparasites and seropositivityes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.date.updated2020-02-06T20:14:32Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.parepi.2019.e00118
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Centro de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales (CIET)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto803-B1-653


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