Show simple item record

dc.creatorRojas Carvajal, Mijail
dc.creatorSequeira Cordero, Andrey
dc.creatorBrenes Sáenz, Juan Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-02T16:02:14Z
dc.date.available2021-07-02T16:02:14Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-27
dc.identifier.citationhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ejn.15160es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1460-9568
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/83845
dc.description.abstractMounting evidence shows that physical activity, social interaction and sensorimotor stimulation provided by environmental enrichment (EE) exert several neurobehavioural effects traditionally interpreted as enhancements relative to standard housing (SH) conditions. However, this evidence rather indicates that SH induces many deficits, which could be ameliorated by exposing animals to an environment vaguely mimicking some features of their wild habitat. Rearing rodents in social isolation (SI) can aggravate such deficits, which can be restored by SH or EE. It is not surprising, therefore, that most preclinical stress models have included severe and unnatural stressors to produce a stress response prominent enough to be distinguishable from SH or SI—frequently used as control groups. Although current stress models induce a stress-related phenotype, they may fail to represent the stress of our urban lifestyle characterized by SI, poor housing and working environments, sedentarism, obesity and limited access to recreational activities and exercise. In the following review, we discuss the stress of living in urban areas and how exposures to and performing activities in green environments are stress relievers. Based on the commonalities between human and animal EE, we discuss how models of housing conditions (e.g., SI–SH– EE) could be adapted to study the stress of our modern lifestyle. The housing conditions model might be easy to implement and replicate leading to more translational results. It may also contribute to accomplishing some ethical commitments by promoting the refinement of procedures to model stress, diminishing animal suffering, enhancing animal welfare and eventually reducing the number of experimental animals needed.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[723-B9-197]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[837-B8-123]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[837-B7-603]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[837-C0-606]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceEuropean Journal of Neuroscience, pp.1-34es_ES
dc.subjectBehaviores_ES
dc.subjectBraines_ES
dc.subjectChronic stresses_ES
dc.subjectEnvironmental enrichmentes_ES
dc.subjectHuman beingses_ES
dc.subjectRatses_ES
dc.subjectSocial isolationes_ES
dc.subjectUrban green areases_ES
dc.subjectUrbanisationes_ES
dc.titleThe environmental enrichment model revisited: A translatable paradigm to study the stress of our modern lifestylees_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ejn.15160
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas (IIP)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Centro de Investigación en Neurociencias (CIN)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto723-B9-197
dc.identifier.codproyecto837-B8-123
dc.identifier.codproyecto837-B7-603
dc.identifier.codproyecto837-C0-606


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record